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Google Buzz

When Google launched its social networking tool, Google Buzz in February 2010, privacy advocates around the world raised concerns regarding its features. Although Google has since made significant changes, the compromises and intrusions of privacy still remain a troubling characteristic of many Web services and online networking applications.

Introducing Google Buzz

Google launched what it expected would be the Twitter/Facebook competitor, Google Buzz on February 9, 2010. It was advertised as “a new way to share updates, photos, videos and more, and start conversations about the things you find interesting.” Buzz was designed to integrate with Gmail – which already had over 146 million users at the time of the launch – and other interface interaction elements with other Google products, such as Google Reader.

The service can also be accessed through supported mobile devices. The mobile version of Buzz is integrated with Google Maps, in order to let users know their location and identify other users who are around them.

Buzz was received with great interest. In the first two days after its launch, tens of millions of users created over nine million posts and comments. On average, there were over 200 posts per minute through mobile phones worldwide.

Responses

However, not all responses to Buzz were positive. Immediately after its introduction, privacy-minded users noticed that Buzz automatically set them up with followers and people to follow. This group of followers is chosen based on the contacts the user emails and chats with the most.

Another issue of concern was that the people a user follows and the people that follow the user are made public to anyone viewing the user’s profile. This is the default setting, which allows anyone who views a profile to see the people who a user chats with or emails most. The implications of this setting were worrisome to some users. For instance, a boss may discover that a subordinate has frequent email contact with executives at a competing firm.

What was distressing to most critics was that Google did not openly explain how the publicly viewable follower lists were determined. Buzz’s unclear opt-out approach put many users in the position of unknowingly sharing personal information. It is clear that Google’s choice to design the lists to show publicly by default was a strategic decision to get as many people using Buzz as quickly as possible. While it may be a helpful setting for some users, others may not feel comfortable with sharing with the world who they email or chat with most.

This glaring privacy flaw was brought to the spotlight two days after Buzz was launched, when Harriet Jacobs saw her personal information revealed to her ex-husband and his abusive friends. Unfortunately, Google automatically allowed her most frequent contacts to view her Google Reader, all the comments on her Reader, as well as her current location, workplace and other sensitive information. Her most frequent email contacts happened to be her ex-husband, his friends and other hostile blog commenters. She was unable to block these users as she never created a Google profile or Buzz profile, which left her unable to prevent them from following her.

Making Changes

Within three days of launching Buzz, Google issued a public apology and made some changes to the program in response to the widely-publicized consumer privacy concerns. It added a more visible opt-out selection to allow users to choose not to show their connections or followers on their profile. This was a rapid response to user concerns, especially when compared to Facebook’s Beacon privacy problems in 2007, which took over a month to resolve.

Although the changes were a positive step in terms of supporting user privacy rights, critics pointed out that Google did not go far enough to address immediate concerns. For instance, the selection box for sharing followers was checked by default. Since this is an option for sharing private or sensitive information, many argued that the box should be unchecked. Given its nature, it would be best to leave that as an opt-in feature.

Furthermore, the opt-out selection did not give users an adequate explanation as to what they were allowing Buzz to publish. Users were not informed that Buzz would publish the list of people they email and chat with most. Although the privacy settings could be adjusted, the problem was that most users do not know how to change these settings. The majority of users simply click “save and continue” until the application is fully set-up, unfortunately reading little of the information contained in the dialog boxes. This made it clear that Google’s changes were an inadequate response to the scope and implication of user’s concerns.

In April 2010, privacy officials from Canada, Germany, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and the UK raised privacy concerns regarding Google Buzz, as well as other Google services. The letter pointed out that even months after its launch, Buzz was still disregarding its user’s privacy rights, despite Google’s promises to the contrary.

Opt-In vs. Opt-Out

Opt-out mechanisms give users the opportunity to express non-agreement to a specific purpose. Unless the user takes action to opt-out, the organization assumes consent and proceeds. The organization should clearly inform the users that failing to opt-out means that the user consents to the use or disclosure of information. For instance, the Google Buzz box presented users with the opt-out choice with a pre-checked box that read, “Show the list of people I’m following and the list of people following me on my public profile.”

Opt-in consent is often referred to as “express consent.” With opt-in consent, the organization presents the users with the opportunity to express positive agreement to a stated purpose. Only with the user’s action will the organization assume consent. Opt-in consent is considered the strongest form of consent. The Privacy Commissioner of Canada encourages organizations to use this form of consent wherever it is appropriate, as it is least likely to result in misunderstandings and complaints.

In the Google Buzz case, an effective opt-in statement for new users might have been a checkbox reading “Show the list of people I’m following and the list of people following me on my public profile. Right now, the list is made up of people you email and chat with most.”

Recommendations

Jennifer Stoddart, the federal Privacy Commissioner of Canada expressed her unease over how such a problematic application like Buzz was launched for public use in the first place. Stoddart did not support the decision to release Buzz in its “beta” form, as it should have demonstrated compliance with fair information principles before it was introduced. She felt it was unacceptable to launch a product that had such significant privacy issues, with the intention of addressing those problems only as they arise. This was also not the first time Google made a glaring privacy error, as Google Street View was launched earlier, without consideration of privacy, data protection laws or cultural norms.

Stoddart and the Privacy Commissioner’s Office sent Google a number of recommendations that would enable it to integrate fundamental privacy principles into its online services. The recommendations included:

  • Collecting and processing only the minimum amount of personal information that is necessary for achieving the purpose of the product or service.
  • Providing clear, unambiguous information regarding the use of personal information.
  • Allowing users to provide informed consent.
  • Creating privacy-protective default settings.
  • Ensuring that privacy control settings are clear and easy to use.
  • Ensuring that all personal data is adequately protected.
  • Giving users simple procedures for account deletion.
  • Honoring user requests in a timely manner.

Summary

This article examines privacy issues raised through the launch of the social networking program Google Buzz. It outlines some critical responses to the privacy settings and risks that the application exposes users to. The article also explores opt-in and opt-out consent mechanisms. Finally, the article takes a look at the Canadian Privacy Commissioner’s response and recommendations to Google Buzz.

CIPP/C Preparation

In preparation for the Certified Information Privacy Professional/Canada exam, a privacy professional should be comfortable with topics related to this post, including:

  • Online privacy, online data collection (V.B.c.)
  • End user expectations (V.C.c.a.i.)
  • End user preferences, opt-in vs. opt-out (V.C.c.a.ii.)

Google Buzz

When Google launched its social networking tool, Google Buzz in February 2010, privacy advocates around the world raised concerns regarding its features. Although Google has since made significant changes, the compromises and intrusions of privacy still remain a troubling characteristic of many Web services and online networking applications.

Introducing Google Buzz

Google launched what it expected would be the Twitter/Facebook competitor, Google Buzz on February 9, 2010. It was advertised as “a new way to share updates, photos, videos and more, and start conversations about the things you find interesting.” Buzz was designed to integrate with Gmail – which already had over 146 million users at the time of the launch – and other interface interaction elements with other Google products, such as Google Reader.

The service can also be accessed through supported mobile devices. The mobile version of Buzz is integrated with Google Maps, in order to let users know their location and identify other users who are around them.

Buzz was received with great interest. In the first two days after its launch, tens of millions of users created over nine million posts and comments. On average, there were over 200 posts per minute through mobile phones worldwide.

Responses

However, not all responses to Buzz were positive. Immediately after its introduction, privacy-minded users noticed that Buzz automatically set them up with followers and people to follow. This group of followers is chosen based on the contacts the user emails and chats with the most.

Another issue of concern was that the people a user follows and the people that follow the user are made public to anyone viewing the user’s profile. This is the default setting, which allows anyone who views a profile to see the people who a user chats with or emails most. The implications of this setting were worrisome to some users. For instance, a boss may discover that a subordinate has frequent email contact with executives at a competing firm.

What was distressing to most critics was that Google did not openly explain how the publicly viewable follower lists were determined. Buzz’s unclear opt-out approach put many users in the position of unknowingly sharing personal information. It is clear that Google’s choice to design the lists to show publicly by default was a strategic decision to get as many people using Buzz as quickly as possible. While it may be a helpful setting for some users, others may not feel comfortable with sharing with the world who they email or chat with most.

This glaring privacy flaw was brought to the spotlight two days after Buzz was launched, when Harriet Jacobs saw her personal information revealed to her ex-husband and his abusive friends. Unfortunately, Google automatically allowed her most frequent contacts to view her Google Reader, all the comments on her Reader, as well as her current location, workplace and other sensitive information. Her most frequent email contacts happened to be her ex-husband, his friends and other hostile blog commenters. She was unable to block these users as she never created a Google profile or Buzz profile, which left her unable to prevent them from following her.

Making Changes

Within three days of launching Buzz, Google issued a public apology and made some changes to the program in response to the widely-publicized consumer privacy concerns. It added a more visible opt-out selection to allow users to choose not to show their connections or followers on their profile. This was a rapid response to user concerns, especially when compared to Facebook’s Beacon privacy problems in 2007, which took over a month to resolve.

Although the changes were a positive step in terms of supporting user privacy rights, critics pointed out that Google did not go far enough to address immediate concerns. For instance, the selection box for sharing followers was checked by default. Since this is an option for sharing private or sensitive information, many argued that the box should be unchecked. Given its nature, it would be best to leave that as an opt-in feature.

Furthermore, the opt-out selection did not give users an adequate explanation as to what they were allowing Buzz to publish. Users were not informed that Buzz would publish the list of people they email and chat with most. Although the privacy settings could be adjusted, the problem was that most users do not know how to change these settings. The majority of users simply click “save and continue” until the application is fully set-up, unfortunately reading little of the information contained in the dialog boxes. This made it clear that Google’s changes were an inadequate response to the scope and implication of user’s concerns.

In April 2010, privacy officials from Canada, Germany, France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain and the UK raised privacy concerns regarding Google Buzz, as well as other Google services. The letter pointed out that even months after its launch, Buzz was still disregarding its user’s privacy rights, despite Google’s promises to the contrary.

Opt-In vs. Opt-Out

Opt-out mechanisms give users the opportunity to express non-agreement to a specific purpose. Unless the user takes action to opt-out, the organization assumes consent and proceeds. The organization should clearly inform the users that failing to opt-out means that the user consents to the use or disclosure of information. For instance, the Google Buzz box presented users with the opt-out choice with a pre-checked box that read, “Show the list of people I’m following and the list of people following me on my public profile.”

Opt-in consent is often referred to as “express consent.” With opt-in consent, the organization presents the users with the opportunity to express positive agreement to a stated purpose. Only with the user’s action will the organization assume consent. Opt-in consent is considered the strongest form of consent. The Privacy Commissioner of Canada encourages organizations to use this form of consent wherever it is appropriate, as it is least likely to result in misunderstandings and complaints.

In the Google Buzz case, an effective opt-in statement for new users might have been a checkbox reading “Show the list of people I’m following and the list of people following me on my public profile. Right now, the list is made up of people you email and chat with most.”

Recommendations

Jennifer Stoddart, the federal Privacy Commissioner of Canada expressed her unease over how such a problematic application like Buzz was launched for public use in the first place. Stoddart did not support the decision to release Buzz in its “beta” form, as it should have demonstrated compliance with fair information principles before it was introduced. She felt it was unacceptable to launch a product that had such significant privacy issues, with the intention of addressing those problems only as they arise. This was also not the first time Google made a glaring privacy error, as Google Street View was launched earlier, without consideration of privacy, data protection laws or cultural norms.

Stoddart and the Privacy Commissioner’s Office sent Google a number of recommendations that would enable it to integrate fundamental privacy principles into its online services. The recommendations included:

  • Collecting and processing only the minimum amount of personal information that is necessary for achieving the purpose of the product or service.

  • Providing clear, unambiguous information regarding the use of personal information.

  • Allowing users to provide informed consent.

  • Creating privacy-protective default settings.

  • Ensuring that privacy control settings are clear and easy to use.

  • Ensuring that all personal data is adequately protected.

  • Giving users simple procedures for account deletion.

  • Honoring user requests in a timely manner.

Summary

This article examines privacy issues raised through the launch of the social networking program Google Buzz. It outlines some critical responses to the privacy settings and risks that the application exposes users to. The article also explores opt-in and opt-out consent mechanisms. Finally, the article takes a look at the Canadian Privacy Commissioner’s response and recommendations to Google Buzz.

CIPP/C Preparation

In preparation for the Certified Information Privacy Professional/Canada exam, a privacy professional should be comfortable with topics related to this post, including:

  • Online privacy, online data collection (V.B.c.)

  • End user expectations (V.C.c.a.i.)

  • End user preferences, opt-in vs. opt-out (V.C.c.a.ii.)

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